Monthly Archives: July 2016

Hillary Clinton In San Francisco: Who Are The Bay Area Power Players

Hillary Clinton In San Francisco: Who Are The Bay Area Power Players

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE

 

http://www.londonworldwide.com/wp-content/uploads/Hillary-In-San-Francisco-Who-Are-The-Bay-Area-Power-Players.pdf

Company Seeks Sponsors For RICO Racketeering Lawsuit Against Eric Schmidt, Elon Musk, Larry Page and John Doerr

Company Seeks Sponsors For RICO Racketeering Lawsuit Against Eric Schmidt, Elon Musk, Larry Page and John Doerr

 

 

 

By Robin Right

 

 

Los Angeles – You might not know all of those names but you do know the names Google, Solyndra, Kleiner Perkins, Tesla and Barack Obama. All of these names cross-financed each other in quid-pro-quo payola schemes. In other words, none of them would exist if not for the dirty political corruption they swapped spit for between each of themselves.

 

 

You will recall that period from 2009 to 2015 when the largest number of Companies, all owned by, or connected to, the Filthy Four got more taxpayer cash than any group of companies in history and then, just as historically, immediately went belly up or engaged in stock swindles. That was the Non-Fabulous Four doing their dirty work.

 

 

These four white yuppie billionaire Silicon Valley frat boys who sleep at each other’s houses, and sometimes in the White House, made a deal to web manipulate and finance elections in exchange for never-ask-questions government hand-out cash and stock market “pumps” in the corrupt Steven Chu Administration of the Department of Energy.

 

 

One company worked with the U.S. Congress, top federal investigators, journalists, whistle-blowers and former employees of the Quadrangle-of-Corruption and has amassed hundreds of thousands of pages of evidence of absolute organized crime by these frat boys.

 

 

One would think that federal cops would have locked these four up long ago but, then again, one would think that federal cops would have locked up those bankers that hijacked Wall Street, a certain rogue email server person and a bunch of other characters that everyone knows are guilty but that somehow seem to evade the slammer. Could it have anything to do with paying off the West Wing?

 

 

It turns out, though, you do not need to wait for Elliot Ness to kick their doors in. You can Do-It-Yourself.

 

 

If you read the WIKIPEDIA description of a “RICO Lawsuit” you will find that you have the power, and the right, to file a lawsuit against the forces of evil and the dirty and corrupt.

 

 

Even better, you should try to get them to SUE YOU! It sounds all wrong but the fact is that, when you file your disclosure and take them on, the first thing they will do is file a “demurrer”. This is a request to dismiss your case before it even gets started. They will use this tactic to try to keep you from getting your day in court. If they sue you, you simply have to say “OK”, get your court date and then file a counter-complaint.

 

 

Let the bad guys do all the heavy lifting of setting up the lawsuit and then you take them down in the jury trial.

 

 

One company is seeking to sue Eric Schmidt, Elon Musk, Larry Page and John Doerr for racketeering and corruption for the vast losses of taxpayer cash they caused and for their attacks on those who competed with them. Another case is planned for a lawsuit against these same four but this time for Homicide. Three Tesla Employees, and some guys named David Bird, Gary D. Conley, Rajeeve Motwani and others are said to have been killed by these guys in order to shut them up. Yet, another group, former employees from a Company called Bright Automotive, are also thinking about suing these fellows. Apparently the Foul Four ordered their politicians to put a “hit job” on Bright Automotive because Bright was getting dangerously close to competing with Elon Musk.

 

 

We can only hope that one of these efforts gets to a jury room so that the public can see the real dirt behind the glitz of these Silicon Valley oligarch mobsters.

 

Sony’s Paul Feig Ghostbusters 2016 flops really hard at the box office

 

Ghostbusters has drummed up some serious hysteria since its release. Leslie Jones managed to get Briebart editor Milo Yianopoulos banned from Twitter, and sick packs of rabid fans upon critics of the movie.

mark kern ghostbusters 2016 user rating

I hardly doubt that the user score will ever go above 2.9.

We also saw the terrible reviews that rolled in citing the movie was trying too hard. For what it’s worth, the movie is a great idea to promote female characters as strong leads, and it had quite a few laughs. Nevertheless, this movie was not the best choice for that approach. A much better choice is the upcoming Wonder Woman starring Gal Godot, and that 2017 summer picture will deliver in spades for DC.

deadpool vs ghostbusters 2016

In other words, even though “Deadpool” had an almost 100 million USD smaller budget. The movie still made +700 million USD more than “Ghostbusters 2016” did.

The all-female spectre busting quartet managed to secure $46 million in its opening weekend, but it doesn’t appear to be quite enough for a profit. Sony put up a serious budget to get the movie made. With over $144 million invested in Director Paul Feig, and analysts realizing movies such as Star Trek, and Jason Bourne’s earning potential its a dark day for Ghostbusters.

ghostbusters 2016 burning money

And still Sony want´s to make a “Ghostbusters 2016” part II movie…

To date, “Ghostbusters” has grossed about $130 million worldwide. However, that’s not even half of what they’ll need to break even and see a profit from the film. If they can make $300 million in sales, that would be a true revival of the franchise and secure a great presence for a sequel but can it happen? With the rumor mill circling that Sony and Paul Feig have decided on three films, it would be on Sony’s best interest to change directors, writers, or even come up with new original ideas for the cast.

twitter and ghostbusters 2016

If you didn´t know it, Milo Yiannopoulos (Greek-British journalist, entrepreneur and technology editor for Breitbart.com) has been permanently banned from Twitter.

The most painful thing about a reboot is that it has to surpass the expectations of the previous movies, and “Ghostbusters” will never do that. The simplest answer is: because the talent was wasted, the script wasn’t original, and the director was trying to prove a point with his established comedy style using comedianne’s instead of male actors.

paul feig is a cuck

Paul Feig (Director and writer for “Ghostbusters 2016”) turned his “Ghostbusters” movie into a feminist/anti-male propaganda machine. In short, the movie was anything but the movie that the “Ghostbusters” fans wanted.

The identicle formula won’t work the same way every time, but that’s something Paul Feig refuses to understand. Success isn’t always measured by the outcome, its measured through effort, balance, and training.

In short, the movie was created and shot as a tribute film with a vendetta that didn’t land a mark on the classical 80’s comedy. It might as well have had a neon sign that said Don’t ask any questions. Just give us your money. And if there ever was one thing that made the advocates angry about the movie it was the comment ” Aint no bitches gonna bust no ghosts,” and that appears to be the case here also.

Amy Pascal sucks another one and Sony eats more shit!

Federal Court Now Calls Nick Denton a “LIAR”!

A Florida judge said Gawker founder Nick Denton “misled” the court about the value of his company — and punished him by ruling that Hulk Hogan could start seizing his assets.

Denton told Judge Pamela Campbell in June that Gawker Media Group, Inc. was worth $276 million.

He didn’t have the cash to post the $50 million bond required to appeal the $140 million verdict awarded to Hogan, so he offered his stock in Gawker instead.

Denton said that his 30 percent stake in Gawker was worth $81 million.

The $81 million figure was “used to give [Hogan] and this court the impression that the stock had significant value,” Campbell says in a decision released Friday.

Based on that representation Campbell agreed to the offer—only to learn later that the stock was worth closer to $30 million.

“Mr Denton…misled this court in connection with [his] pledge of Gawker Media Group, Inc. stock by concealing material information about the value of that stock which a reasonable person, under the circumstances, should have disclosed,” Campbell says in the order.

What Denton did not disclose is that he’d already prepared to file bankruptcy on behalf of Gawker and had pledged to sell the company for just $90 million.

That sale price meant that Denton’s share was worth under $30 million—not the $81 million he cited to the court.

“These are all material facts affecting the value of the stock Mr. Denton and Mr. Daulerio pledged,” Campbell says in the ruling.

“The integrity of the civil litigation process depends on truthful disclosure of facts. Revealing only some of the facts does not constitute truthful disclosure,” she writes.

In Friday’s ruling the judge found that the new, $30 million value of Denton’s stock “is not adequate” for the bond.

So she ruled that Hogan can start collecting on the jury award.

Hogan’s attorney, David Houston, said his client “will do all within his power to enforce his judgment against” Denton.

Denton plans to ask an appeals court for an emergency stay of Judge Campbell’s ruling.

“I have to say that I think the court really got this one wrong,” Denton said. “The $81 million company valuation the court relied on was Hogan’s valuation. We told the court they did not know what the company’s shares would be worth.

“There was no misrepresentation,” he said.

Gawker’s Denton Can’t Halt Hulk Hogan From Enforcing Verdict

July 29, 2016 — 1:28 PM PDT Updated on July 29, 2016 — 2:52 PM PDT
  • Media executive misled court about company value, judge says
  • Court frees pro wrestler to try to seize Denton’s assets

Gawker Media founder Nick Denton lost his latest bid to halt enforcement of the $140 million verdict won by Hulk Hogan in an invasion-of-privacy lawsuit, according to a court document provided by the former pro wrestler’s attorney.

Florida Judge Pamela Campbell said Friday that she would let Hogan try to collect the jury award — in part because Denton misled her at a June 10 hearing about the value of his company stock. 

Typically, the loser of a lawsuit has to turn over money or something valuable to the court while pursuing an appeal. Denton had told the court at the hearing that he would use stock in Gawker worth $81 million as security to guarantee payment of the jury verdict. But the media company had, just the day before, approved resolutions to put itself into bankruptcy. 

Also, in May, a potential buyer had offered to make an opening bid of $90 million for the company’s assets, meaning Denton’s shares would be worth much less than what the court was told.

The judge said Denton hid “material information about the value of that stock which a reasonable person, under similar circumstances, should have disclosed.”

Gregg Thomas, an attorney for Denton, referred questions to Gawker’s First Amendment lawyer Seth Berlin, who didn’t immediately return a call for comment. Denton has said that allowing Hogan to collect while appeals of the verdict are pending threatens guarantees of freedom of the press.

For now, Gawker’s bankruptcy in Manhattan federal court protects it from enforcement of the Hogan verdict.  The federal judge refused to extend that shield to Denton, who would have to file his own bankruptcy to put the brakes on collection efforts against him personally.

A jury found that Denton and a former Gawker editor, A.J. Daulerio, invaded Hogan’s privacy by publishing video excerpts of the wrestler having sex with a friend’s wife.

Hogan’s attorney David Houston said Denton may try to get an appeals court in Florida to halt collection. If that effort fails, Hogan could file court papers by Monday in New York, where Denton’s assets are located, that will enable him to collect, Houston said.

While protected from Hogan in bankruptcy, Gawker plans to sell itself at a court-supervised auction. Ziff Davis has agreed to open with a $90 million bid and to keep Denton on if it wins. Under bankruptcy court rules, Hogan’s judgment would be treated as an unsecured claim against Gawker, meaning he stands to collect a share of the sale proceeds only after more senior creditors are paid in full.

The case is Bollea v. Gawker Media LLC, 12012447-CI-011 (Florida 6th Judicial Circuit, Pinellas County). The bankruptcy case is In re Gawker Media LLC, 16-11700, U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).

 

Filed under

Federal Court Now Calls Nick Denton a “LIAR”!

A Florida judge said Gawker founder Nick Denton “misled” the court about the value of his company — and punished him by ruling that Hulk Hogan could start seizing his assets.

Denton told Judge Pamela Campbell in June that Gawker Media Group, Inc. was worth $276 million.

He didn’t have the cash to post the $50 million bond required to appeal the $140 million verdict awarded to Hogan, so he offered his stock in Gawker instead.

Denton said that his 30 percent stake in Gawker was worth $81 million.

The $81 million figure was “used to give [Hogan] and this court the impression that the stock had significant value,” Campbell says in a decision released Friday.

Based on that representation Campbell agreed to the offer—only to learn later that the stock was worth closer to $30 million.

“Mr Denton…misled this court in connection with [his] pledge of Gawker Media Group, Inc. stock by concealing material information about the value of that stock which a reasonable person, under the circumstances, should have disclosed,” Campbell says in the order.

What Denton did not disclose is that he’d already prepared to file bankruptcy on behalf of Gawker and had pledged to sell the company for just $90 million.

That sale price meant that Denton’s share was worth under $30 million—not the $81 million he cited to the court.

“These are all material facts affecting the value of the stock Mr. Denton and Mr. Daulerio pledged,” Campbell says in the ruling.

“The integrity of the civil litigation process depends on truthful disclosure of facts. Revealing only some of the facts does not constitute truthful disclosure,” she writes.

In Friday’s ruling the judge found that the new, $30 million value of Denton’s stock “is not adequate” for the bond.

So she ruled that Hogan can start collecting on the jury award.

Hogan’s attorney, David Houston, said his client “will do all within his power to enforce his judgment against” Denton.

Denton plans to ask an appeals court for an emergency stay of Judge Campbell’s ruling.

“I have to say that I think the court really got this one wrong,” Denton said. “The $81 million company valuation the court relied on was Hogan’s valuation. We told the court they did not know what the company’s shares would be worth.

“There was no misrepresentation,” he said.

Gawker’s Denton Can’t Halt Hulk Hogan From Enforcing Verdict

July 29, 2016 — 1:28 PM PDT Updated on July 29, 2016 — 2:52 PM PDT
  • Media executive misled court about company value, judge says
  • Court frees pro wrestler to try to seize Denton’s assets

Gawker Media founder Nick Denton lost his latest bid to halt enforcement of the $140 million verdict won by Hulk Hogan in an invasion-of-privacy lawsuit, according to a court document provided by the former pro wrestler’s attorney.

Florida Judge Pamela Campbell said Friday that she would let Hogan try to collect the jury award — in part because Denton misled her at a June 10 hearing about the value of his company stock. 

Typically, the loser of a lawsuit has to turn over money or something valuable to the court while pursuing an appeal. Denton had told the court at the hearing that he would use stock in Gawker worth $81 million as security to guarantee payment of the jury verdict. But the media company had, just the day before, approved resolutions to put itself into bankruptcy. 

Also, in May, a potential buyer had offered to make an opening bid of $90 million for the company’s assets, meaning Denton’s shares would be worth much less than what the court was told.

The judge said Denton hid “material information about the value of that stock which a reasonable person, under similar circumstances, should have disclosed.”

Gregg Thomas, an attorney for Denton, referred questions to Gawker’s First Amendment lawyer Seth Berlin, who didn’t immediately return a call for comment. Denton has said that allowing Hogan to collect while appeals of the verdict are pending threatens guarantees of freedom of the press.

For now, Gawker’s bankruptcy in Manhattan federal court protects it from enforcement of the Hogan verdict.  The federal judge refused to extend that shield to Denton, who would have to file his own bankruptcy to put the brakes on collection efforts against him personally.

A jury found that Denton and a former Gawker editor, A.J. Daulerio, invaded Hogan’s privacy by publishing video excerpts of the wrestler having sex with a friend’s wife.

Hogan’s attorney David Houston said Denton may try to get an appeals court in Florida to halt collection. If that effort fails, Hogan could file court papers by Monday in New York, where Denton’s assets are located, that will enable him to collect, Houston said.

While protected from Hogan in bankruptcy, Gawker plans to sell itself at a court-supervised auction. Ziff Davis has agreed to open with a $90 million bid and to keep Denton on if it wins. Under bankruptcy court rules, Hogan’s judgment would be treated as an unsecured claim against Gawker, meaning he stands to collect a share of the sale proceeds only after more senior creditors are paid in full.

The case is Bollea v. Gawker Media LLC, 12012447-CI-011 (Florida 6th Judicial Circuit, Pinellas County). The bankruptcy case is In re Gawker Media LLC, 16-11700, U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).

 

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See The Congressional Investigation Archive of the Entire Energy Department Scandal

See The Congressional Investigation Archive of the Entire Energy Department Scandal

See the crazy billionaires, the exploding batteries and the political kick-backs that led to some of the biggest political corruption in U.S. history. From the character assassinations to actual murders, these are the original investigation records that forced over 50 of the top players in Washington to lose their careers because those corrupt bureaucrats cost American taxpayers to lose nearly a trillion dollars.

CLICK HERE TO SEE IT ALL

 

Bee Sperm Havoc Leads To Less Honey

Leading insecticide cuts bee sperm by almost 40%, study shows

Discovery provides possible explanation for increasing deaths of honeybees in recent years, according to scientists

Previous studies have shown how neonicotinoids reduce the number bumblebees queens produced
Previous studies have shown how neonicotinoids reduce the number bumblebees queens produced. Photograph: Richard Becker/Alamy Stock Photo

The world’s most widely used insecticide is an inadvertent contraceptive for bees, cutting live sperm in males by almost 40%, according to research. The study also showed the neonicotinoid pesticides cut the lifespan of the drones by a third.

The scientists say the discovery provides one possible explanation for the increasing deaths of honeybees in recent years, as well as for the general decline of wild insect pollinators throughout the northern hemisphere.

Bees and other insects are vital for pollinating three-quarters of the world’s food crops but have been in significant decline, due to the loss of flower-rich habitats, disease and pests and the use of pesticides.

Neonicotinoids were banned from use on flowering crops in the EU in 2013. The UK opposed the ban and allowed a limited “emergency” lifting of the ban in 2015, but has refused further suspensions this year. There is clear scientific evidence that neonicotinoids harm bees, but there is only a little research showing the pesticides harm the overall performance of colonies.

Previous work has shown that neonicotinoids reduce the number of bumblebee queens produced and severely cuts the survival and reproduction of honeybee queens. But the new research, led by Lars Straub at the University of Bern, Switzerland and published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, is the first to test how neonicotinoids affect male bee fertility.

They exposed drones to the levels of two neonicotinoids, thiamethoxam and clothianidin, seen in fields, and found that they had on average 39% less living sperm compared with unexposed bees. “Any influence on sperm quality may have profound consequences for the fitness of the queen, as well as the entire colony,” said the researchers.

Queen bees perform mating flights soon after emerging to collect and store sperm from multiple males, which is then used for reproduction over the queen’s lifetime. The drones reach sexual maturity at 14 days, but the researchers found 32% of the exposed drones were dead by then, and therefore unable to mate, compared to 17% of the unexposed controls.

“This could have severe consequences for colony fitness, as well as reduce overall genetic variation within honeybee populations,” the scientists said.

The researchers also found that exposed drones lived for 15 days compared to 22 days for the controls. They concluded: “For the first time, we have demonstrated that frequently employed neonicotinoid insecticides can elicit important lethal and sub-lethal effects on non-target, beneficial male insects; this may have broad population-level implications.”

Peter Campbell, from Syngenta, the company that makes thiamethoxam, said the new research was interesting. However, he noted that the sperm quality of all the drones in the study was reduced, compared to earlier work. “Given the multiple mating of honeybee queens it is unclear what the consequences of a reduction in sperm quality would actually have on queen fecundity,” he said.

Christopher Connolly, at the University of Dundee and not part of the research team, said: “This study is important, as failures in honeybee queen mating is reported to be a growing problem for beekeepers.”

He added: “Although the insecticide levels used in this study are realistic, it is unclear whether both neonicotinoids are commonly consumed together at these levels.

“Therefore, it will be important to investigate the impact of the neonicotinoids separately. Importantly, this study demonstrates the complexity of the possible consequences from chronic exposure to pesticides and these are not assessed during safety testing. Therefore, this study further supports the need to adopt the precautionary principle on neonicotinoids.”

Elon Musk Wants To Kill You All With His Space X Rocket Rides: Space Gives You Heart Disease And Gamma Radiation Cancer

Apollo deep space astronauts five times more likely to die from heart disease

First long-term study into health of Apollo crews shows deep space missions might take their toll, exposing astronauts to blood vessel-damaging radiation

A 1969 crew portrait of Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong, left, Michael Collins, centre, and Buzz Aldrin.
A 1969 crew portrait of Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong, left, Michael Collins, centre, and Buzz Aldrin. Photograph: AP/Nasa

Travelling to the moon, Mars or beyond could dramatically increase an astronaut’s risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, the first research into the long-term health of Apollo spacemen has revealed.

Nasa’s Apollo programme sent nine manned missions and 24 astronauts beyond low Earth orbit during the 1960s and early 1970s, including Apollo 11, which delivered Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the moon. But it seems such missions might have taken their toll.

A team of researchers looking into the fate of the Apollo astronauts has discovered that their rate of death from cardiovascular disease is four to five times higher than that seen for astronauts of the same era who only flew in low Earth orbits, or who never flew on an orbital mission at all.

That, the researchers say, suggests that venturing beyond the Earth’s protective magnetic field could cause long-lasting damage to the cardiovascular system, potentially as a result of exposure to deep space radiation.

The findings come as a number of space agencies and commercial enterprises are looking to venture to the moon and beyond, with Nasa planning to send humans to Mars in the 2030s.

“With all of these plans for going into deep space we have only had this one really small group [of Apollo astronauts] that has actually done it,” said Michael Delp, first author of the study from Florida State University. “Previous to this study nobody had ever looked at their long-term health consequences – really pulling out the Apollo astronauts out of the group of other astronauts.”

Jeff Hoffmann, former Nasa astronaut and director of the Man Vehicle Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, agreed, adding that when it comes to travelling to the moon and beyond, the findings suggest speed might be of the essence.

“We can’t shield against high energy cosmic radiation, not with our current mass-limiting capabilities, but it does re-emphasise the importance of getting to Mars as quickly as possible,” he said. “The less time you spend in deep space the less exposed you are getting to the radiation.”

Writing in the journal Scientific Reports, a team of researchers including scientists from Johnson Space Centre and Nasa Ames Research Centre describe how they compared the causes of death for the seven Apollo astronauts who had died up to that point with those of 35 low Earth orbit astronauts from the same era, and 35 non-flight astronauts.

While the sample size is tiny – a clear limitation to the study – the results reveal that 45% of the Apollo astronauts died from cardiovascular disease, compared to only 9% of non-flight astronauts and 11% of low Earth orbit astronauts.

While no difference was seen when the rate was compared to that of the general population, Delp believes that is most likely because astronauts are very fit and healthy, whereas the members of the public suffer from a wide range of conditions that could increase their risk of cardiovascular disease.

“Part of the reason why this cardiovascular effect has never been uncovered is because you are always looking and comparing [astronauts with] a general population,” he said.

To probe whether deep space radiation might be behind their findings, the researchers exposed mice to conditions that simulated weightlessness as well as the radiation found in deep space.

With previous studies showing that both radiation and weightlessness can, in the short term, damage the blood vessels of the mice, the researchers waited 6-7 months before investigating the effects – a period equivalent to around 20 human years.

The results revealed that while weightlessness did not cause any lasting cardiovascular harm, the radiation did. Mice exposed to radiation were found to have sustained damage to the cells lining their blood vessels – damage that could increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The fact that, by contrast, weightlessness caused no lasting damage makes sense, says Delp. “That corresponds with what we saw with the low Earth orbit [astronauts] – they may have problems immediately when they come back, which we know they do, but they recover.”

Richard Hughson, of the University of Waterloo in Canada, who has studied the effect space travel on the cardiovascular systems of astronauts, described the new research as “fascinating”.

While Hughson notes that the sample size for the Apollo lunar astronauts is very small, he believes the study puts forward a plausible suggestion for why lunar astronauts appear to be succumbing cardiovascular disease at a higher than expected rate.

“I think it is really important that Nasa and the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and so on, recognise now that the cardiovascular system should be an important focus, one they look at, when they send astronauts beyond low Earth orbit,” he said.

With only an ultrasound device and a blood-pressure test needed to check for damage to the lining of the blood vessels, Hughson believes astronauts could monitor the effects of the radiation during their time in deep space, while the results also flag the importance of checking up on the cardiovascular health of astronauts once their have returned to Earth. “We just did this within the last month on Tim Peake when he came back from space,” he said.

Hoffman agrees that such check-ups are important. “I go down to Nasa every year for a thorough physical examination and if they know that cardiovascular fitness is important, that is something they can monitor you for every year and hopefully reduce the risk of a premature death from heart problems,” he said.

Delp admits that a deeper look into the medical history of the Apollo astronauts is needed to make sure that the findings are not the result of other factors – including their somewhat eclectic post-mission lifestyles. But, he adds, the new research also raises further conundrums, from the radiation doses needed to damage the cardiovascular system to whether the effects differ between the sexes and whether the problem can be lessened.

“All of these are future questions that really I think are important to address before we start sending humans into deep space again,” he said.

Mark Zuckerberg is caught trapping its users in ‘filter bubbles’ on Facebook in order to steer election results

Milo Yiannopoulos destroys Twitter as Twitter stock crashes and Twitter staff implode San Francisco job search boards

 

Twitter stock down more than 13% after lacklustre growth in Q2

Posted 3 hours ago by Ingrid Lunden (@ingridlunden)
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Twitter’s share price is getting battered once again: the company’s stock has tumbled by more than 13 percent in trading today, a day after the social media platform posted an earnings report that pointed to poor growth in user numbers both in logged in and logged out users; sluggish revenue; and mediocre projections for Q3.
The company’s stock has gone as low as $15.94 today (it’s $15.97 as of 10:15 PT). That figure is well off its 52-week high of $36.67 from almost a year ago; and for those keeping track, Twitter’s current $11 billion market cap is well below its IPO valuation of $18 billion; as investors who are not convinced about the company’s business projections continue to sell off shares.
From earlier today:
Screen Shot 2016-07-27 at 16.20.57
The company yesterday reported a mixed Q2. While it better analysts’ estimates on earnings per share, its revenues of $602 million was less impressive — within the company’s own estimated range, but falling short of what analysts had expected.
More problematic is the direction the revenue is going: $602 million was largely unchanged from the previous quarter, and only about 20% higher than a year ago. The bulk of Twitter’s revenues come from advertising sales, and as Josh pointed out, key to the problem is that revenue growth is slowing down: a year ago, revenue figures were up 60% on the year previously.
Added to this is the fact that the company is today making a lot of deals to start bringing more content to the platform, specifically premium video content in sports. But for the moment, these are neutral deals at best when considering the business: the content — how it will look, whether people will really flock to watch it — is not fully rolled out; it’s not clear whether these deals are costing Twitter money just to get done; and they have yet to bear any near-term fruits in terms of ad sales.
Indeed, Twitter’s Q3 guidance is that it expects revenues in the range of $590 million and $610 million. The midpoint of that range is actually lower than Q2’s revenues.
Twitter’s user numbers are another issue for the company. Yesterday, the company noted that total monthly active users were only 313 million in Q2. That number was up only 3% on a year ago, which is not idea, but as Twitter likes to point out, it has many more “logged out” users who are not registered on the platform, dipping into Twitter to consume, if not engage, in the content.
However, even in this metric there seems to be a problem. CFO Anthony Noto yesterday noted during the Q2 analyst call that those users are totalling around 500 million — and the company is increasingly trying to monetise that user base, for example by tracking and following those users with ads and providing them with other features to get them to visit and stay for longer (and maybe, one day, register to be full users).
But one small detail that I noticed is that 500 million is actually the same number of logged out users that Twitter has been quoting for months. Does that mean that logged out users have stagnated, too?
(The company does not report daily active users, an issue that some analysts raised yesterday during the call, with Noto replying that it’s always evaluating which metrics to use, so maybe it will get reintroduced at some point.)

Millenials Boycott Home Buying. No more Babies, No More Mortgages, No More Bank Schemes

Homeownership Rate in the U.S. Drops to Lowest Since 1965

 

 

The U.S. homeownership rate fell to the lowest in more than 50 years as rising prices put buying out of reach for many renters.

The share of Americans who own their homes was 62.9 percent in the second quarter, the lowest since 1965, according to a Census Bureau report Thursday. It was the second straight quarterly decrease, down from 63.5 percent in the previous three months.

The drop extends a years-long decline from the last housing boom, in part because of tight credit and a shift toward renting in the aftermath of the crash. First-time buyers have been struggling to find affordable properties as low mortgage rates and an improving job market spur competition for a tight supply of listings. Home prices rose 5.2 percent in May from a year earlier, according to the S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller index of values in 20 cities released this week.

“One of the biggest hurdles now is affordability,” Mark Vitner, a senior economist at Wells Fargo Securities LLC in Charlotte, North Carolina, said before the Census Bureau report was released. “Home prices are rising so much faster than incomes, so it’s hard for buyers to save for a down payment.”

The homeownership rate reached a peak of 69.2 percent in June 2004.

More Renters

The decline may be the result of young people leaving parents’ homes and entering the rental market, which dilutes the number of owner-occupant households, said Ralph McLaughlin, chief economist for data provider Trulia. He said the change from a year earlier, when the rate was 63.4 percent, isn’t statistically significant because of the margin of error of 0.5 percentage points.

“The drop in the homeownership rate this quarter to historical lows isn’t necessarily a bad sign,” McLaughlin said in an e-mail. “This is because renter households are growing at a much faster rate than owner households, reflecting growing confidence of those who were most likely impacted by the foreclosure crisis. Still, low inventory and affordability plagues those who do want to buy a home.”

The homeownership rate for Americans ages 18-34 fell to 34.1 percent in the second quarter from 34.8 percent a year earlier, the Census Bureau said. The decline is within the margin of error for that age group of 0.8 percentage points.

 

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History of U.S. Election Trends Tells One Inevitable Story for American Elections in 2016

WikiLeaks Releases Hacked Audio of US Democratic Party Voicemails

DNC Chairwoman, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., greeted the Florida delegation at a breakfast

WikiLeaks Releases Hacked Audio of US Democratic Party Voicemails

© AP Photo/ Matt Slocum
US

03:12 28.07.2016(updated 03:48 28.07.2016) Get short URL
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After releasing nearly 20,000 emails from the US Democratic National Committee, WikiLeaks has dumped audio recordings from the organization.

The new release includes 29 voice messages pulled from the emails of high-ranking DNC officials, totaling 14 minutes.

One file (#16014) involves a Clinton supporter calling to demand that Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders be prevented from winning the primary.

The emails released over the weekend showed that officials within the ostensibly neutral organization had a clear bias toward former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Sanders supporters were outraged, and the embarrassment forced DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz to resign ahead of this week’s convention. NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden has pointed out, however, that her replacement has been shown to be equally guilty of anti-Sanders bias.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange had promised the release of more documents.

The latest release comes on the same night that US President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak at the convention.

Sputnik is in the process of delving into this new release, and will update our readers as revelations emerge.

Feds To Track How Mark Zuckerberg and John Doerr hide their cash

U.S. to Expand Tracking of Home Purchases by Shell Companies

Photo

 
Multimillion-dollar mansions are spreading in Los Angeles and their international owners are hidden by shell companies. Credit Monica Almeida/The New York Times

More than a quarter of the all-cash luxury home purchases made using shell companies in Manhattan and Miami were flagged as suspicious in a new effort to unearth money laundering in real estate, the Treasury Department said Wednesday. As a result, officials said they would expand the program to other areas across the country.

The expansion of the effort to identify and track the people behind shell companies, begun in March, means that there will now be increased scrutiny of luxury real estate purchases made in cash in all five boroughs of New York City, counties north of Miami, Los Angeles County, San Diego County, the three counties around San Francisco and the county that includes San Antonio.

The examination, known as a geographic targeting order, is part of a broad effort by the federal government to crack down on money laundering and secretive shell companies.

“The information we have obtained from our initial G.T.O.s suggests that we are on the right track,” Jamal El-Hindi, the acting director of the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network within the Treasury, said in a department news release. “By expanding the G.T.O.s to other major cities, we will learn even more about the money laundering risks in the national real estate markets, helping us determine our future regulatory course.”

Among the suspicious transactions that the Treasury Department found tied to sales in New York or Miami this year were a $16 million cash withdrawal, a person involved in counterfeit checks and someone involved in moving $7 million around in shell companies associated with South America, Treasury officials said.

The areas being added to the order are places where buyers frequently purchase luxury real estate using shell companies, the officials said. The dollar values involved purchases of more than $500,000 or more in Bexar County, which includes San Antonio; $1 million in Florida; $2 million in California; $3 million in Manhattan; and $1.5 million in the other boroughs of New York City. Title insurance companies, which are involved in virtually all real estate transactions, are charged with carrying out the order.

Treasury officials have said that their real estate tracking program was inspired in part by a series last year in The New York Times that examined the rising use of shell companies. The investigation found that real estate professionals, especially in the luxury market, often do not know much about buyers, and it uncovered numerous buyers of high-end real estate who had been subject to government investigations around the world.

One installment of The Times’s investigation documented properties purchased in shell companies by friends and family of the prime minister of Malaysia. Those properties were subject to the largest asset forfeiture order ever in a kleptocracy case, which was announced this month.

Treasury officials said they were seeing benefits to the program in Manhattan and Miami, citing an increase in suspicious-activity reports being filed by banks and noting that the Department of Justice is finding the combination of the real estate and banking information to be helpful in its investigations.

The broadening of the rule signifies that the Treasury Department thinks the benefits to law enforcement from this sort of data collection are likely worth the cost to the industry, said Eric Berg, a lawyer at Foley & Lardner in Milwaukee and former member of the kleptocracy unit at the Department of Justice.

“There’s a lot of pushback from industry,” Mr. Berg said. “Clearly some sort of internal dialogue came to the conclusion that this is worth doing.”

Even though the title companies are ordered to identify the buyers, the burden often falls to the real estate agent, said Aaron Leider, the president of the Beverly Hills/Greater Los Angeles Association of Realtors and owner of the Keller Williams agency in the Brentwood area.

“They come to us, because who knows the client?” he said. “They don’t know the client.”

Realtor associations in California and nationally have been in discussions in recent months about how much agents need to do to comply with the rule, Mr. Leider said.

Treasury officials said the data collected in these six markets would be used to evaluate a permanent rule in the future.

The “HIT JOB” they put on Scott and his friends

The “HIT JOB” they put on Scott and his friends

By Andrew Weinstein

While most people may think that “hit-jobs” are the realm of Hollywood movie plots, these kinds of corporate assassination attempts do take place daily in big business and politics.

At the request of the U.S. Government, Scott developed and patented an energy technology that affected trillions of dollars of oil company and technology billionaire insider profits. He didn’t realize this at the time. Now he wishes he had never gotten the call from Washington.

Let me make this point clearly: The control of Trillions of dollars of energy industry profits were being fought over by two groups and the Government plunked Scott down in the middle of that war. Scott had no affiliation with either group. He thought he was just accepting a challenge to help his nation.

He won commendation from the U.S. Congress in the Iraq War Bill, He won federal patents, he won a Congressional grant, he won a huge number of letters of acclaim and he won the wrath of a handful of insane billionaires who could not compete with his technology.

The attacks were carried out by California State employees and U.S. Government officials who had received payment from these billionaires.

Department of Energy Executives and their campaign billionaire handlers engaged in these attacks in order to control the solar and “green car” markets. The did not care about green issues, they only cared about green cash.

Federal and state employees ran retribution campaigns against applicants who competed with inside deals they had set up to line their own pockets at taxpayer expense.

These corrupt politicians thought they could take over an estimated six trillion dollar “Cleantech” industry that was being created to exploit new marketing opportunities around global warming and middle east disruption. After an epic number of Solyndra-esque failures, all owned by the Department of Energy Executives and their campaign financiers, the scheme fell apart. The non crony applicants suffered the worst fates. As CBS News reporter Cheryl Attkisson has reported, the willingness to engage in media “hitjobs” was only exceeded by the audacity with which Department of Energy officials employed such tactics.

Now, in a number of notorious trials and email leaks, including the Hulk Hogan lawsuit and the DNC and Panama Papers leaks, the public has gotten to see the depths to which public officials are willing to stoop to cheat rather than compete in the open market.

Department of Energy employees and State of California employees engaged in the following documented attacks against applicants who were competing with their billionaire backers personal stock holdings. Scott and the other applicants including Bright Automotive, Aptera, Eco-Motors and many more, suffered these attacks:

– Social Security, SSI, SDI, Disability and other earned benefits were stone-walled. Applications were “lost”. Files in the application process “disappeared”. Lois Lerner hard drive “incidents” took place.

– State and federal employees played an endless game of Catch-22 by arbitrarily determining that deadlines had passed that they, the government officials, had stonewalled and obfuscated applications for, in order to force these deadlines that they set, to appear to be missed.

– Some applicants found themselves strangely poisoned, not unlike the Alexander Litvenko case. Heavy metals and toxic materials were found right after their work with the Department of Energy weapons and energy facilities. Many wonder if these “targets” were intentionally exposed to toxins in retribution for their testimony. The federal MSDS documents clearly show that a number of these people were exposed to deadly compounds and radiations without being provided with proper HazMat suits which DOE officials knew were required.

– Applicants employers were called, and faxed, and ordered to fire applicants from their places of employment, in the middle of the day, with no notice, as a retribution tactic.

– Applicants HR and employment records, on recruiting and hiring databases, were embedded with negative keywords in order to prevent them from gaining future employment.

– One Gary D. Conley and one Rajeev Motwani, both whistle-blowers in this matter, turned up dead under strange circumstances. They are not alone in a series of bizarre deaths related to the DOE.

– Disability and VA complaint hearings and benefits were frozen, delayed, denied or subjected to lost records and “missing hard drives” as in the Lois Lerner case.

– Paypal and other on-line payments for on-line sales were delayed, hidden, or re-directed in order to terminate income potential for applicants who competed with DOE interests and holdings.

– DNS redirection, website spoofing which sent applicants websites to dead ends and other Internet activity manipulations were conducted.

– Campaign finance dirty tricks contractors IN-Q-Tel, Think Progress, Media Matters, Gawker Media, Syd Blumenthal, etc., were hired by DOE Executives and their campaign financiers to attack applicants who competed with DOE executives stocks and personal assets.

– Covert DOE partner: Google, transfered large sums of cash to dirty tricks contractors and then manually locked the media portion of the attacks into the top lines of the top pages of all Google searches globally, for years, with hidden embedded codes in the links and web-pages which multiplied the attacks on applicants by many magnitudes.

– Honeytraps and moles were employed by the attackers. In this tactic, people who covertly worked for the attackers were employed to approach the “target” in order to spy on and misdirect the subject.

– Mortgage and rental applications had red flags added to them in databases to prevent the targets from getting homes or apartments.

– McCarthy-Era “Black-lists” were created and employed against applicants who competed with DOE executives and their campaign financiers to prevent them from funding and future employment.

– Targets were very carefully placed in a position of not being able to get jobs, unemployment benefits, disability benefits or acquire any possible sources of income. The retribution tactics were audacious, overt..and quite illegal.

So, the next time you are asked to “Serve Your Country”, consider the implications if you do a good job.

While law enforcement, regulators and journalists are now clamping down on each, and every, one of the attackers, one-by-one, the process is slow. The victims have been forced to turn to the filing of lawsuits in order to seek justice.

At World’s Largest Hedge Fund, Sex, Fear and Video Surveillance

At World’s Largest Hedge Fund, Sex, Fear and Video Surveillance

Ray Dalio, the billionaire founder of the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, likes to say that one of his firm’s core operating principles is “radical transparency” when it comes to airing employee grievances and concerns.

But one employee said in a complaint earlier this year that the hedge fund was like a “cauldron of fear and intimidation.”

The employee’s complaint with the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, which has not been previously reported, describes an atmosphere of constant surveillance by video and recordings of all meetings — and the presence of patrolling security guards — that silence employees who do not fit the Bridgewater mold.

Hedge funds tend to be a highly secretive bunch, yet even within their universe Bridgewater stands out. The allegations, as well as interviews with seven former employees or people who have done work for the firm and a filing by the National Labor Relations Board, open a window into the inner workings of a $154 billion company that, despite its mammoth size, remains obscure. The firm is governed by “Principles” — more than 200 of them — set out in a little white book of Mr. Dalio’s musings on life and business that some on Wall Street have likened to a religious text.

Secrecy at Bridgewater is so tight that in some units employees are required to lock up their personal cellphones each morning when they arrive at work.

Ray Dalio discussed radical transparency with Andrew Ross Sorkin of The New York Times in 2014. Video by The New York Times

In his complaint, Christopher Tarui, a 34-year-old adviser to large institutional investors in Bridgewater, contends that his male supervisor sexually harassed him for about a year by propositioning him for sex and talking about sex during work trips.

After he complained last fall, Mr. Tarui said, several Bridgewater top managers confronted him and sought to pressure him to rescind his claims. One manager, he said, accused him of lying and said that he was “blowing this whole thing out of proportion.” These and other allegations in the complaint could not be independently verified.

Mr. Tarui said he remained silent for many months about the harassment out of fear the incident would not remain private and would impede his chances for promotion at the firm, which is based in Westport, Conn. “The company’s culture ensures that I had no one I could trust to keep my experience confidential,” he said in the complaint, which was filed in January.

Continue reading the main story

Jointly, Bridgewater and Mr. Tarui asked in March to withdraw the complaint from consideration by the Connecticut human rights commission. No reason was given by either party for the request, which halted the investigation. Bridgewater’s employment agreement requires employees to settle disputes through binding arbitration.

In a related action, the National Labor Relations Board recently filed a separate complaint against Bridgewater. The new complaint says that the company “has been interfering with, restraining and coercing” Mr. Tarui and other employees from exercising their rights through confidentiality agreements that all employees are required to sign when they are hired.

Both Mr. Tarui’s harassment complaint and the labor board’s filings were obtained by The New York Times through Freedom of Information Act requests.

“While it is difficult for our management team to independently judge the merits of this claim, we are confident our handling of this claim is consistent with our stated principles and the law,” Bridgewater said in an emailed statement. “We look forward to operating through a legal process that brings the truth to light.”

Mr. Tarui’s assertions about Bridgewater’s surveillance culture and its chilling effect were echoed in interviews with seven people who are former employees or who have done work for the firm. The people were not permitted to speak publicly because of the confidentiality agreements they had signed with Bridgewater.

It is routine for recordings of contentious meetings to be archived and later shown to employees as part of the company’s policy of learning from mistakes. Several former employees recalled one video that Bridgewater showed to new employees that was of a confrontation several years ago between top executives including Mr. Dalio and a woman who was a manager at the time, who breaks down crying. The video was intended to give new employees a taste of Bridgewater’s culture of openly challenging employees and putting them on the spot.

The firm no longer shows the video, the people said.

These former employees said other behavior had raised concerns within the company. At an off-site retreat in 2012 with several top executives — including Greg Jensen, Bridgewater’s co-chief investment officer — employees got drunk and went swimming naked, prompting complaints from some other employees in attendance.

 

Document: Complaint Against Bridgewater

Founded in 1975, Bridgewater manages billions of dollars for some of the biggest pension funds and sovereign wealth funds in the world. Its founder, Mr. Dalio, 66, is a celebrity in his own right — he has been a speaker at exclusive conferences like the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, and recently attended a White House state dinner.

Steady performance for years has led institutional investors around the world to give Bridgewater money. For a time, James B. Comey, the current director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, was the company’s general counsel, adding to its luster.

But over the last two years, the firm has lost billions of dollars for investors as a result of mixed performances and has begun to slow its hiring. And questions have arisen about Bridgewater’s unusual culture.

Mr. Tarui has been on paid leave from the firm since Jan. 6, two days before he filed his harassment complaint. The labor relations board said in its separate complaint that Mr. Tarui was suspended after he “threatened to file a charge with the board.”

Douglas Wigdor, Mr. Tarui’s lawyer, declined to comment and said his client would not comment.

Bridgewater, in a legal filing with the labor relations board, said its employment agreements were “tailored specifically to protecting Bridgewater’s legitimate business concerns, including confidentiality interests that are unique to the financial services industry.”

A Bridgewater employee for five years, Mr. Tarui was responsible for meeting with large public pension funds. He previously worked for Pimco, the bond giant based in Newport Beach, Calif.

In his complaint, Mr. Tarui said that the sexual advances began during a business trip to Denver in May 2014, when his supervisor “caressed the small of my back” while the two men were seated on a couch in the supervisor’s hotel room. Mr. Tarui said the incident made him feel uncomfortable and he immediately left the room.

But the supervisor continued to pursue him, Mr. Tarui said in his complaint. On one occasion, he said, his supervisor confided in him that he had an “itch to scratch,” and then asked Mr. Tarui whether he had ever “thought about being with other men.” Mr. Tarui said he told his supervisor he “was not wired that way.” But his supervisor persisted, Mr. Tarui said, adding that his boss then “specifically asked whether I would consent to having a sexual experience with him.”

Mr. Tarui said he again rejected his supervisor’s advances but his supervisor continued to make overt and subtle sexual overtures well into last summer.

Mr. Tarui said in the complaint that he did not report the conduct out of fear it would become public because of the firm’s policy of videotaping confrontations between employees.

Eventually, Mr. Tarui did complain after his supervisor gave him a bad job performance rating even though he had been promoted and given a pay raise just a few months earlier. He said in the complaint that during a meeting in November 2015, he told a Bridgewater human resources representative and another top manager about the repeated sexual harassment by the supervisor.

As is the case with every meeting at Bridgewater, the meeting was recorded. So was a later meeting with several top executives at Bridgewater including David McCormick, the firm’s president. Mr. Tarui said recordings from those meetings were “widely shared” with managerial employees at Bridgewater.

The firm promised an investigation. But in his complaint Mr. Tarui said that Bridgewater’s management tried to persuade him to withdraw his allegations.

Other Bridgewater employees have complained internally about unusual antics at a corporate outing, saying that it went beyond what was acceptable behavior at a work event.

After the 2012 retreat, which was attended by more than 30 employees, several who had attended complained that they had felt uncomfortable at the excessive drinking and skinny-dipping, three former employees said. The retreat also provoked internal quarreling because several people who attended poked fun at Mr. Dalio during a campfire, these same people said.

An employee who helped arrange the retreat was later fired by Bridgewater, these people said.

Google INTENTIONALLY Censors Trump From Search For Presidential Candidates

Google INTENTIONALLY Censors Trump From Search For Presidential Candidates

Trump left out of Google search for presidential candidates

 

COLUMBUS (WCMH) – Need to know who’s running for President of the United States? Don’t Google it.

candidates-headerWednesday morning, searching for ‘presidential candidates’ brought up a handy guide above all of the other search results with pictures of candidates with active campaigns. Clicking on a picture brought up searches for the candidates.

The only problem is that Republican candidate Donald Trump wasn’t included. Neither is Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson.

Results were shown for Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Green Party candidate Jill Stein.

As of 9:15am Wednesday, the guide above the search results has been removed.

In a tweet on July 17, Green Party candidate Jill Stein posted a screen shot of another version of the guide showing five candidates. Sometime between then and this morning, Donald Trump and Gary Johnson disappeared.

Tesla fires Mobileye as auto pilot supplier and ACKNOWLEDGES That Tesla’s Kill People!

Tesla fires Mobileye as auto pilot supplier

Ends in a divorce

Tesla just ended its long term relations with Israeli based Mobileye. This comes as a rather sudden and unexpected shock as Mobileye is the company behind Tesla’s now very famous autopilot. 

The announcement comes weeks after Tesla’s first fatality happened in a Mobileye powered Tesla autopilot. Fudzilla sees this as a potentially huge opportunity for Nvidia as Jensen’s company, which he loves to CAPITALISE, really wants to get inside  ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) based cars. That is one of the main focus for Nvidia with its famous Tegra.

Mobileye supplied  software and hardware  for Tesla but it claims that it works with other car industry giants including Volvo, BMW, GM, Hyundai, Opel, Peugeot, Citroen, Mitsubishi, Honda and Chrysler. Mobileye shares fell 9.7 percent to $44.53 in New York Stock Exchange trading today.

The company uses cameras to assist drivers with forward collision warning, pedestrian collision warning, lane departure warning, speed limit indication, intelligent beam control and a few other tricks. The main goal is to keep you safer than you are without it.

“Mobileye’s work with Tesla will not extend beyond the EyeQ3,” the company said in a prepared statement. “We continue to support and maintain the current Tesla Autopilot product plans. This includes a significant upgrade of several functions that affect both the ability to respond to crash avoidance and to optimize auto-steering in the near term, without any hardware updates.”

Tesla only represented about one percent of revenue for Mobileye but the market fears that the confidence in the company may be shaken after the accident. It all looks a bit too perfect,  as if Tesla was looking for a reason to give Mobileye the  boot.

This looks like a major blow for existing Tesla owners, as they will be stuck with hardware and software from Mobileye, and apparently Elon Musk doesn’t trust the guys, considering he just fired them.

Mobileye and BMW still promise to deliver a completely autonomous self-driving car by 2021, while some other players including some insiders from Nvidia told Fudzilla that autonomous self-driving cars might be on streets by 2020. 

Google is NOT a Public Service

Google is NOT a Public Service

 

 

By Anton Weebs

 

 

Google is NOT a “Public Service”. Google is a Public Nuisance.

 

 

Do not ever be lulled into the facade that “Google serves a public need”. Google is not there to help you. Google is there to abuse your information, manipulate your news, steer your votes, spy on you for politicians and provide Eric Schmidt and Larry Page with billions of dollars in government kick-backs from their bribery of public officials.

 

 

Google is pure evil!

 

 

How ‘corrupt’ is Google? – Quora

 

“Corrupt”? What’s that supposed to mean? It’s an organization. It’s both intent on building a better online world while at the same time making a …

 

https://www.quora.com/How-corrupt-is-Google

 

 

 

Everybody’s Getting Corrupt Google Search Results Except Europe

 

For the first time ever, Google has given into regulatory pressure to change its search results. Today, the company reached a settlement with …

 

http://valleywag.gawker.com/everybodys%5B…%5Dgoogle-search-results-excep-1516875335

 

 

 

Ira Israel: Why Google Is Evil – The Huffington Post

 

Power tends to corrupt and absolute … I have been trying to get two small businesses listed correctly on Google Places for … Why Google Is Evil.

 

http://m.huffingtonpost.com/ira-israel/why-google-is-evil_b_3716786.html

 

 

 

Obama and Google’s Corrupt Cronyism | RealClearPolitics

 

Obama and Google’s Corrupt Cronyism | RealClearPolitics.

 

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/2015/%5B…%5Doogle039s_corrupt_cronyism_354084.html

 

 

 

Google’s tax avoidance highlights political corruption | TheINQUIRER

 

IT WAS WITH REFRESHING CANDOUR earlier this week that Google chairman Eric Schmidt defended his firm’s tax avoidance schemes in the …

 

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/op%5B…%5Didance-highlights-political-corruption

 

 

 

Reuters Exposes Shocker: Banks Need $250 Billion Per Month To Stay Afloat or Wall Street will implode!

By Jamie McGeever

Eight years after the global financial crisis and years after the U.S. and British central banks stopped their quantitative easing bond-buying programmes, the amount of QE stimulus being pumped into the world financial system has never been higher.

The European Central Bank and Bank of Japan are buying around $180 billion of assets a month, according to Deutsche Bank, a larger global total than at any point since 2009, even when the Federal Reserve’s QE programme was in full flow.

And if market consensus proves accurate, that total is about to rise by billions more — with the ECB, BOJ and even Bank of England all expected to expand their QE programmes soon to try and bolster fragile growth and lift stubbornly low inflation.

Global QE: tmsnrt.rs/2aH1xGc

G4 cenbank balance sheets: tmsnrt.rs/2aHvp5i

The $180 billion total is roughly split down the middle between the ECB and BOJ, according to Deutsche, and is measured on a rolling 12-month basis.

ABN Amro expects the ECB to increase its QE to 100 billion euros a month from 80 billion and extend the programme by nine months to the end of next year. JP Morgan predicts the BOJ will up its QE programme by 25 percent to 100 trillion yen ($960 billion) annually.

Following Britain’s vote to leave the European Union and the anticipated hit to the UK economy as a result, many analysts now expect the BoE to reactivate its bond-buying programme — dormant since 2012. Barclays expects up to 150 billion pounds ($197 billion) extra QE.

These are among the most aggressive forecasts. But with world growth struggling to avoid an effective recession and inflation still below official target rates in many countries, central bank balance sheets are about to get bigger.

(Reporting and graphics by Jamie McGeever; Editing by Mike Dolan and Jeremy Gaunt)

Google CEO found to be ruining Google Because He Gets Paid To Much!

Highest-paid CEOs run worst-performing companies, research finds

Research firm finds businesses led by lower-paid CEOs earn greater shareholder return

The highest-paid CEOs tend to run some of the worst-performing companies, according to new research.

The study, carried out by corporate research firm MSCI, found that for every $100 (£76) invested in companies with the highest-paid CEOs would have grown to $265 (£202) over 10 years.

But the same amount invested in the companies with the lowest-paid CEOs would have grown to $367 (£279) over a decade.

Titled Are CEOs paid for performance? Evaluating the Effectiveness of Equity Incentives, the report looked at the salaries of 800 CEOs at 429 large and medium-sized US companies between 2005 and 2014 and compared it with the total shareholder return of the companies.

p1-by114-payper-16u-20160724183306.jpg

The report notes: “Equity incentive awards now comprise 70% or more of total summary CEO pay in the United States, based on our calculations. Yet we found little evidence to show a link between the large proportion of pay that such awards represent and long-term company stock performance.

“In fact, even after adjusting for company size and sector, companies with lower total summary CEO pay levels more consistently displayed higher long-term investment returns.

Recommending the focus shift away from annual reports to longer-term performance, it adds: “Closer scrutiny of the relationship between CEO pay and performance over longer time periods could lead to different conclusions.”

Ric Marshall, a senior corporate governance researcher at MSCI, said in a statement: “The highest paid had the worst performance by a significant margin. It just argues for the equity portion of CEO pay to be more conservative.”

“Whether you look at the entire group or adjust by market-cap and sector, you really get very similar results.”

SONY PICTURES GETS CAUGHT HARASSING WHISTLE-BLOWERS WITH POLITICAL SHENANIGANS

SONY PICTURES GETS CAUGHT HARASSING WHISTLE-BLOWERS WITH POLITICAL SHENANIGANS

 

Official who oversees whistle-blower complaints files one of his own

 

  • Daniel Meyer says Pentagon retaliated against him over ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ case

  • The case fuels criticism that the whistleblower system is broken

  • Sony funds the White House and got special CIA favors for Zero Dark Thirty because of campaign financing by Sony

  • Meyer has since moved to key role in Obama effort to overhaul treatment of retaliation complaints

 

 

An investigation into how makers of the film “Zero Dark Thirty” learned classified details about the hunt for Osama bin Laden is behind a claim from the Pentagon’s former top official overseeing whistleblower complaints that he was the victim of retaliation. A draft report initially singled out then-Defense Secretary Leon Panetta for the leak, but the final report did not include that allegation. Carolyn Kaster AP

 

By Marisa Taylor

mtaylor@mcclatchydc.com

    WASHINGTON

    The Obama administration’s top official overseeing how intelligence agencies handle whistleblower retaliation claims has lodged his own complaint, alleging he was punished for disclosing “public corruption.”

    Daniel Meyer, who previously oversaw the Defense Department’s decisions on whistleblowing cases, also says he was targeted for being gay, according to records obtained by McClatchy.

    Meyer made the allegations in a complaintbefore the Merit Systems Protection Board, an administrative panel that handles employmentgrievances from federal employees, after another agency rejected his claims.

    Meyer’s claims add to a barrage of allegations that the federal government’s handling of defense and intelligence whistleblower cases is flawed.

    In the complaint, Meyer, who once worked for the Pentagon’s inspector general’s office, accused his former Defense Department bosses of “manipulation of a final report to curry favor” with then-Defense Secretary Leon Panetta.

    The inspector general’s report concluded that Panetta had leaked classified information to the makers of the Sony film “Zero Dark Thirty,” Meyer said. That conclusion was later removed after then-acting Inspector General Lynne Halbrooks met privately with Panetta, he said. Meyer does not accuse Panetta or Halbrooks of making the change.

    Halbrooks, who is now practicing law at a private firm, said she’s certain Meyer’s complaint will be rejected. “During my time in the Office of Inspector General, I strongly supported the rights of whistleblowers throughout the Department of Defense,” she said in an email. “I am confident that any government agency’s review of Mr. Meyer’s allegations will find them to be without any merit.”

    In April, the Office of Special Counsel, an agency that handles complaints of retaliation by whistleblowers rejected Meyer’s claims, citing a lack of evidence.

    In support of his retaliation claims, Meyer filed a sworn affidavit by his former boss, John Crane, a onetime assistant Defense Department inspector general. Crane was fired in 2013 and now alleges he, too, was retaliated against because of his involvement in the “Zero Dark Thirty” case and other controversial whistleblower claims, including one filed by former high-ranking National Security Agency official Thomas Drake. Meyer’s claims add to a barrage of allegations that the federal government’s handling of defense and intelligence whistleblower cases is flawed.

    “We could neither corroborate Mr. Crane’s statements with any documentary evidence nor conclude that his statements are more reliable than statements from others in your chain of command and with the evidentiary record as a whole,” Aaron Lloyd, a lawyer with the counsel’s office, wrote Meyer.

    The counsel’s spokesman, Nick Schwellenbach, did not respond to questions. Meyer, who currently works for the intelligence community inspector general, said through a spokeswoman that he was “happy to be part of the intelligence community and looks forward to the (Merit Systems Protection Board) closing out any remaining issues” from his work at the Defense Department.

    Panetta, who retired as defense secretary in 2013 after previously serving as CIA director, did not respond to requests for comment. Jeremy Bash, a spokesman for Panetta, told a reporter, “You (or your source) have some basic facts wrong,” but he declined to elaborate.Bash then referred questions to the Pentagon inspector general’s office.

    Kathie R. Scarrah, a spokeswoman for that office, said she was “precluded from commenting on anyone’s potential (Merit Systems Protection Board) matter.” The current acting inspector general, Glenn Fine, took over after Meyer alleges he was retaliated against.

    While at the Pentagon, Meyer was known for aggressively investigating whistleblowers’ allegations of retaliation. His current office reviews and investigates not only whistleblower retaliation claims but alsohigh-profile security matters within the intelligence community. His office, for instance, notified the FBI that classified emails had been found on Hillary Clinton’s private email server. The referral led to an FBI investigation.

    Meyer was not involved in the Clinton matter. However, he is supposed to have a key role in President Barack Obama’s initiative to improve the intelligence community’s response to whistleblower complaints. That initiative was announced after the leak by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

    Snowden, who leaked details on the agency’s then-classified mass collection of Americans’ email and phone records, has said he was prompted to disclose classified information to the media because his efforts to report what he felt was wrongdoing in the government’s eavesdropping program had failed.

    The inspector general investigation singled out by Meyer examined allegations that classified and sensitive information was leaked to Sony’s Kathryn Bigelow, the director of “Zero Dark Thirty,” and the film’s screenwriter, Mark Boal.

    The inspector general investigation singled out by Meyer examined allegations that classified and sensitive information was leaked to Kathryn Bigelow, the director of “Zero Dark Thirty,” and its screenwriter, Mark Boal.

    An initial version of the findings concluded that while serving as CIA director – the post he’d held before moving to the Pentagon – Panetta had disclosed classified information to Boal, the only person without top-secret clearance who’d attended a June 24, 2011, ceremony at CIA headquarters honoring the SEAL team that killed bin Laden.

    In his speech to the gathering, Panetta cited classified NSA intelligence and top-secret military information, including the protected identity of the SEAL ground commander, according to the draft report, which was completed in late 2012 and leaked to the Project on Government Oversight, a nonprofit government watchdog organization, in June 2013.

    When the controversy first erupted, Panetta spokesman Bash said Panetta had thought everyone in the audience had security clearances and was permitted to hear classified information.

    In July 2013, Meyer became the executive director of whistleblowing for the intelligence community inspector general.

    After he left the Pentagon, Meyer and other Pentagon inspector general employees were grilled about whether they’d leaked the draft of the “Zero Dark Thirty” report. The draft report was not classified, and Meyer denied being the leaker.

    When the final report on the matter came out eight months after being leaked, the findings on Panetta had been removed.

    Although the Pentagon inspector general’s office did not determine who’d leaked the draft report, Meyer volunteered to investigators that he’d sent the draft report to staffers on the Senate Intelligence Committee and the Senate Armed Services Committee as part of his duties to inform the panels that have oversight on such matters.

    Meyer was found to have made an “unauthorized disclosure” to Congress, according to documents obtained by McClatchy.

    Separately, Meyer was accused of making false statements, according to documents obtained by McClatchy, but those documents don’t specify the nature of the statements.

    In the complaint to the Merit Systems Protection Board, Meyer also accused his former bosses of inappropriately interfering in an investigation of the Afghan National Military Hospital.

    Army Col. Mark Fassl, then the inspector general for the training command, had alleged to the Pentagon inspector general’s office that his supervisors had tried to interfere during an investigation of corruption at the hospital. He presented evidence of the medical neglect of Afghan soldiers, including the starvation of one. The inspector general later substantiated his allegations, but Fassl was not treated as a whistleblower. He later told McClatchy he regarded himself as one.

    Meyer said he and Crane complained to Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, in 2012 about their office’s inaction on the case, including not telling investigators in Afghanistan about the starving soldier.

    As a result of his involvement in such cases, Meyer was passed over for promotions and raises and his career suffered other unfair setbacks, he says.

    He charges that the alleged retaliation was compounded by discrimination due to his sexual orientation.

    Meyer accused Henry Shelley, the general counsel of the inspector general’s office, of obstructing his investigations of whistleblower cases because of his “personal animus . . . that Mr. Meyer was openly homosexual” and therefore “had a bias that would support allegations of whistleblowers.” Meyer also cited Crane as a witness to the alleged discrimination.

    Earlier this year, the counsel’s office asked the Justice Department’s inspector general to investigate Crane’s allegations that the Pentagon inspector general’s office may have improperly destroyed evidence during the high-profile leak prosecution of Drake. The former NSA official is also alleging that the Pentagon inspector general mishandled his whistleblower case.

    Marisa Taylor: 202-383-6164, @marisaataylor

     

     

     

    Why everyone is miserable on Tinder

    Why everyone is miserable on Tinder

     
     

    Dating is a bruising sport; that’s always been the trouble. Apps like Tinder were supposed to save people from the ache of rejection by matching those who have already expressed interest in each other. But these platforms only created a new problem. The scourge of modern singledom is no longer the unrequited crush — it’s the tepid, mutual “like” … that nobody can be bothered to do anything about.

    Why do people swipe right on each other, but then never connect? A preliminary new study from researchers at Queen Mary University of London, Sapienza University of Rome, and the Royal Ottawa Health Care Group collected data on just how bad this phenomenon is.

    Researchers created 14 decoy Tinder profiles in London — male and female — and automatically liked everybody within a 100-mile radius. Then they waited to see what fraction of people would like them back, and what fraction of those would send a message.

    The fake male profiles received little attention. They matched with others around 0.6 percent of the time. The fake female profiles were much more popular — about 10 percent of people liked them back (most of them men).

    Men were much less likely to start a conversation with the decoy profiles. Only 7 percent of men who matched with a fake profile sent a message, compared to 21 percent of women who matched with a fake profile. In total though, many more men sent messages since the overwhelming majority of matches came from men.

    These statistics illustrate how men and women use Tinder differently. The researchers say that men seem to be much less discriminating — they are more likely to swipe right, but also much less likely to follow through with a message. Women, on the other hand, tend to swipe right when they are serious about connecting.

    This, of course, squares with the anecdotal experience of many people who use these dating apps. A follow-up survey of Tinder users confirmed that about one third of men said that most of the time they “casually like most profiles,” while women overwhelmingly said that they only swiped right on profiles they were actually attracted to.

    The researchers caution that these behaviors may be self-reinforcing. When men are swipe-happy on Tinder, women can get overwhelmed with attention, making them choosier. This makes men even more desperate, and even less discerning about who they like. So the situation descends into confusion.

    “This gaming of the system undermines its operation and likely leads to much frustration,” they write. People start to get suspicious of their matches — did the other party actually look at their profile? Or were they just swiping right on everyone?

    Another study by Jennie Zhang and Taha Yasseri of Oxford analyzed the conversations that people had after they already match. Zhang and Yasseri cannot disclose which dating app they looked at, but it seems very similar to Tinder. They collected about 2 million conversations involving 400,000 heterosexual users from the United States.

     

    The results were bleak. About half of the conversations were completely one-sided — the other person just didn’t respond. When there was a mutual conversation, people exchanged phone numbers only about 19 percent of the time.

    Those who did decide to send a message tended to be quick about it. Half of people who reached out waited less than eight hours after being notified of their match. About 15 percent sent a message within the first minute. If the other party responded, half usually did it within a few hours, while a large fraction waited a day or more.

    Zhang and Yasseri also noticed strange gender differences in response rates. Men, who initiated about 80 percent of the conversations, were more likely than women to get a response. When men messaged first, women wrote back about 53 percent of the time. When women messaged first, men wrote back only 42 percent of the time.

    This is more evidence, they argue, that men take these kinds of apps less seriously. When a woman matches with a man, she can’t be sure how interested he is; it’s riskier for her to reach out. This encourages women to be less proactive on these apps, reinforcing gender stereotypes.

    Online dating is not all terrible, but these studies confirm that the problems of the real world pretty much recapitulate themselves online. People are desperate to connect with each other, but also terrified of rejection. If apps like Tinder and Hinge seem frustrating and unproductive, it’s not just you. That’s pretty much the average experience for people, everywhere (but we find happiness anyway).

    Driver in Fatal Tesla Crash Using Autopilot Was Speeding Because His Tesla Is Poorly Engineered

     

     

     

     

     

     
    Driver in Fatal Tesla Crash Using Autopilot Was Speeding Because His Tesla Is Poorly Engineered

     
    Why Tesla’s Autopilot Is Under Investigation
    • NTSB releases initial report on May 7 wreck that killed driver
    • Preliminary report doesn’t conclude why car didn’t brake

    Federal investigators probing the deadly wreck in Florida of a Tesla car that was using automated driving technology have found that the vehicle was speeding when it hit a truck.

    The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report Tuesday on the May 7 crash that the Tesla was traveling at 74 miles (119 kilometers) per hour in a zone where the limit was 65 miles per hour.

    The Model S Tesla was being operated by what the car company calls Autopilot. The NTSB called the system “Traffic-Aware Cruise Control and Autosteer.” The car also had an automatic emergency braking system that was designed to slow or stop before a collision, according to the NTSB.

    The 40-year-old Ohio man who was driving the Tesla was killed in the crash near Williston, Florida. In a blog post, Tesla said that the crash was the first known fatality in more than 130 million miles of Autopilot driving. That compares to a fatality every 94 million miles among all vehicles in the U.S.

    The safety board released photos of the highway and vehicles involved, including a shot that shows the Tesla’s roof sheared off. The car passed underneath a semi-trailer, coasted off the road 297 feet, and struck a utility pole.

    Car’s Computer

    The tractor-trailer, which was transporting a load of blueberries to a local farm, sustained only minor damage. NTSB investigators used three-dimensional laser scans to document the crash scene, the car and the truck. The safety board is continuing to collect and analyze vehicle performance data from the car’s computer.

    Both the NTSB and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are investigating the crash. The preliminary NTSB report didn’t include any conclusions about why the collision occurred or whether Tesla’s Autopilot system contains any flaws. There’s no set date for the final report, although it typically takes a year or more for the safety board to complete an investigation.

    Tesla spokeswoman Khobi Brooklyn didn’t immediately respond to e-mailed questions.

    Tesla’s automation didn’t notice the white side of the tractor trailer as it turned in front of the car against a brightly lit sky so the brake wasn’t applied, according to the carmaker.

    A large number of Tesla drivers have died when their Tesla suddenly lurched forward. Anti-Tesla advocates claim that Elon Musk has always used an inappropriate accelerator pedal mechanism to build the Tesla’s.

    Government To Reconfirm That Goldman Sachs Is A Criminally Corrupt Racketeering Operation

    Goldman Sachs

    The Fed Is About to Drop a $50 Million Penalty on Goldman Sachs (Again)

    U.S. Stocks Fall From Record as Microsoft, Google Miss on Profit
    Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

    Bank employees leaked confidential government info.

    The U.S. Federal Reserve is preparing an enforcement action against Goldman Sachs Group Inc related to a leak of confidential government information to one of its employees, the New York Times reported on Monday.

    The action will include a penalty of less than $50 million, the Times said, citing people briefed on the matter.

    The Fed is also considering taking action against a former Goldman executive who had access to the leaked material, according to the Times, which did not name the former executive.

    Representatives for Goldman and the Fed did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

    The Fed penalty would come two years after revelations that an employee at the New York Fed, Jason Gross, had leaked sensitive information to a Goldman banker named Rohit Bansal. Gross and Bansal pleaded guilty to theft of government property in November.

    Goldman has already paid a $50 million penalty to New York’s Department of Financial Services related to the issue.

    Fat returns for those who help companies take legal action

    Litigation investors are exploring the possibility of funding up to $2M in Plaintiff legal expenses in exchange for a percentage of the award from a jury trial. The case financing opportunity is now open to bid.


    Investing in litigation

    Second-hand suits

    Fat returns for those who help companies take legal action

     

    COMPANIES need to make the best returns on the assets they have in hand. But what if a company does not know that it has them, or whether it can use them? In some cases a lawsuit could be a valuable earner. A technology company in liquidation might have a patent-infringement suit that the bankruptcy’s administrators lack the time to pursue. There may be money to be made by suing a joint-venture partner, but the prospect of a costly case dissuades managers from going to court.

    Enter “third-party funders”. These outside investors offer to pay for a lawsuit, in exchange for a share of the payout: from 30% to 60%. Some lawyers work on contingency (“no win, no fee”) arrangements, but others cannot shoulder the risk. So third-party funders may get involved.

    Returns are impressive enough to have drawn in both hedge funds and traditional financial companies. Allianz, a German insurer, built a profitable lawsuit-funding unit before running into conflicts of interest with suits aimed at its insurance customers. It closed shop. Credit Suisse built and then spun off its litigation-finance unit, now called Parabellum (the Latin for “prepare for war”.)

    The potential profits can be seen in the results of three public companies that specialise in funding litigation: Burford and Juridica, both listed in London but focusing on America, and IMF, the first public litigation funder, based in Australia. Juridica, which released results on March 15th, made $38m in cash profits on $256m under investment. Juridica concentrates on monetising court wins and settlements, and immediately returning the cash to shareholders. Last year it offered the highest dividend yield on London’s AIM market, which specialises in smaller companies.

    The biggest risk, says Richard Fields, Juridica’s founder and chief executive, is not the quality of cases. He says the company invested in 30 of some 1,200 it considered, and has profited from all that have been concluded. The risk is timing: courts’ gears grind slowly before suddenly producing results, so cashflow is “lumpy”.

    Burford, though a year younger, is bigger than Juridica, and funds a wide spectrum of cases. It boasts a 61% net return on invested capital in 2012. Christopher Bogart, its co-founder and boss, says that chief financial officers understand when he describes lawsuits as assets: “I’m not talking about doing anything different with litigation than they’re talking about doing with photocopiers and aeroplanes.”

    Some worry that funding others’ lawsuits is unethical. A common-law prohibition against “maintenance” and “champerty” used to forbid outsiders from meddling in lawsuits or taking cuts from judgments. But such rules have loosened. Lord Jackson, a former judge asked in 2009 by the British government to review civil-law costs, has praised outside funding.

    America, with its astronomical legal costs, has other worries. Robert Weber, IBM’s general counsel, wrote in February that third-party funding was “the latest gimmick in a headlong rush to degrade legal professionalism”. America’s Chamber of Commerce, a business lobby, fears that funding will encourage junk lawsuits. But John Peysner of the University of Lincoln sees “no evidence at all” to justify such concerns. Steven Garber, an economist at RAND, a think-tank, says the economics of filing low-merit cases make little sense. The best business is in unlocking good cases that otherwise might not be filed, rather than in funding a slew of uncertain ones in the hope that some are settled for their “nuisance value”, or that a few big wins pay for the rest.

    For now, demand for outside funding outstrips supply. The global litigation-finance industry is probably worth more than $1 billion today. But only a small part of all litigation is funded by outsiders. That proportion looks likely to grow.

    Top Russian KGB Agent Explains How Google Actually Works

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VryOoVYkln0

     

    Microsoft: Google Is Screwing The Public

    LINK TO MORE

    Yahoo: The death of The Giant

    The giant’s fall

    Next Story

    One of the saddest scenes in the Lord Of The Rings trilogy is watching the slow-moving Ents – the massive tree shepherds that took days to decide whether or not to react Sauron’s onslaught – are cut down by the wily Orcs. Only a few fall in the battle but when they do the giants of the forests that at first seemed so powerful are exposed to be easily vanquished. They won the battle but we can presume the fallen ones made great kindling for the Orc’s fires.

    Yahoo isn’t kindling yet but it – like the mighty AOL Ent on which you’re reading this – has fallen. Mayer’s Old Web property is now part of a phone company, a prospect that would be unfathomable when the first web portals hit the scene.

    Think about Yahoo’s mission. Originally a catalog of important things on the web it became what Year 2000 dot-commers called a portal. It was, at its core, a sort of app store with multiple features including chat, weather, mail, and photo storage. It was an early, simple web-based operating system and it was as far away from the backward, boring infrastructure companies that were then trying to figure out a way forward in the online economy.

    But infrastructure has one thing going for it: it has revenue, year after year, and that revenue can be used to take down upstarts when they’re weak. That’s exactly what happened here.

    Yahoo wasn’t always doomed. It was once, like AOL, a web giant. It still gathers millions of eyeballs and plenty of traffic. But then slowly (then quickly) Google overtook all comers with its superior search and that search revenue helped the company expand away from its core business leading it to create a true app store as well as a truly powerful mobile infrastructure. Yahoo and AOL, for their parts, focused on ad automation and when Facebook ate a piece of that pie they had little left to fight over. The once mighty giants were struck blow after blow and they couldn’t survive.

    What is Verizon doing with its relics of Internet Past? Not much. They have been fairly hands-off with AOL (and this site) and their interest, I suspect, is in building a media conglomerate like Disney or Comcast – a set of businesses that report to the mothership and use synergy and shared goals to raise all boats. Whether or not a company like Verizon whose primary expertise is in setting up cell towers can do this is still up in the proverbial air but here’s hoping.

    There aren’t many tech giants left. Hardware greats like Xerox, Cisco, and Nokia are moribund. Software houses like Oracle and Microsoft are doing enough to be dangerous and little more. And old-guard websites are basically no more except perhaps Amazon and Drudge. If the 2010s have brought anything it’s been a wholesale cleanout of massive tech brands and the rise of hundreds of orc-like replacements.

    The thing that is sadder still is that more giants will fall over the next few years. Gawker is already teetering, about the fall into the ZDNet swamps. Travel stalwarts like Kayak and CheapCaribbean are being replaced by low cost travel apps that reduce the complexity of booking a trip to nil. Advertising companies have been swallowed up one by one until there are only a few left. The only things really left to disrupt are online banking and commodity web hosting and those spaces are deeply entrenched.

    Yahoo was the last of the giants. There are plenty of smaller companies still around from the 1990s but they were always scurrying in Yahoo’s shadow. Now the company’s forward facing tools and media services will be folded into Verizon and when Yahoo employees become AOL employees it will be harder to separate out what was Yahoo and what wasn’t. Like the venerable Treebeard, Yahoo will put down roots, grow leaves, and become part of the undifferentiated forest. It was sad but expected.

    REDDIT Called Out As DNC Facade

     

     

    Reddit Involved In Massive Cover-Up Of Clinton Cash, DNC Disaster, Wasserman Schultz And Wikileaks News

     

     

     

    Reddit, a website that claims to be ‘the front page of internet’, is officially dead.

     

    The soon to be link graveyard has continued to destroy itself by censoring information by the way of bot fraud, shadow bans, political payoffs, and comment suppression.

     

    With 99% of Sundays news focusing on the DNC disaster, Debbie Wasserman Schultz , The Clinton Cash documentary, and the WikiLeaks dump, I would think the front page of Reddit, a reader based news aggregate, would be full of stories about these important events.

     

    Well, think again…

     

    Here is the so-called ‘front page of the internet’ at around 1 AM EST….

     

    1 reddit

     

    2 reddit

     

    3 reddit

     

    25 front page stories and not one mention of the DNC, Clinton, Wasserman Schultz or WikiLeaks.

     

    Lets check the subreddit /r/news…There has to be something there..

     

    4 reddit

     

    5 reddit

     

    6 reddit

     

    NOTHING……Talk about a total news blackout….The number one story is about the Olympics?

     

    Give me a f***ing break….

     

    I wonder how much cash Reddit received from shadowy Clinton groups to keep this news from the front page?

     

    Not enough, because all the cash in the world can’t save Reddit from becoming the next…..

     

    Digg_Logo_Large

     

    One of the few places on Reddit that had some good coverage was /r/conspiracy.

     

    Ironically, all of the important news comes from a group of “tin foil hat wearing” conspiracy theorists who think the Government was involved in 9/11 and the war on drugs is a fraud.

     

    reddit conspiracy

     

    reddit conspiracy

     

    Screen Shot 2016-07-25 at 2.05.05 AM

     

    reddit conspiracy

     

    Unfortunately, Reddit just committed political suicide, just like their co-founder Aaron Swartz. The only difference is Swartz was a champion of free speech and the free flow of information, while Reddit, on the other hand, has become the proverbial ‘gatekeeper’ like Google, Facebook and Twitter.

     

    aaron swartz

     

    UPDATE

     

    To no ones surprise a Reddit MOD killed the story labeling it ‘off topic’ which is hardly the case.

     

    R1

     

    Welcome to Digg…

     

    reddit 2

     

    You can view the thread here…..

     

    Studies find that Netflix can kill you!

    ‘Netflix and chill’ could lead to fatal blood clots, study suggests 

     

     

    Breaking Bad still 
    Hours spent watching box-sets such as Breaking Bad could increase the risk of fatal blood clots, scientists say Credit: AP

     

     

    Bingeing on TV box-sets could be fatal, research suggests.

    Hours of inactivity slumped in front of a television sharply raises the risk of dying from a blood clot in the lungs, say scientists.

    A Japanese team studied the TV viewing habits of more than 86,000 people aged 40 to 79 between 1988 and 1990.

    They found that every additional two hours viewing per day increased the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism by 40 per cent.

    Participants who watched five or more hours of programmes daily were more than twice as likely to die over the following 19 years than those who watched less than two and a half hours.

    Researchers said those who planned lengthy television sessions should take the same precautions as those embarking on long-haul flights.

    Sleeping on a flight 
    Those planning binge sessions of TV could face risks of DVT more commonly linked with long-haul flights Credit: AP

    The scientists from Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine recommended a five minute walk every hour.

    They said recent trends – such as “binge-watching” box sets via online streaming, and reliance on laptops and tablets – could put increased numbers at risk. 

    However, the overall risk of such deaths appeared low. Just 59 deaths from the fatal clots were recorded from among 86,000 cases tracked, though scientists said cases were likely to be under-reported, as the condition can easily be missed.

    Pulmonary embolism is a highly dangerous condition closely linked to inactivity.

    It usually begins as a clot in the leg or pelvis, but can become particularly dangerous if it breaks free and travels to the lung, becoming lodged in a small blood vessel, where it is particularly dangerous.

    More than a quarter of people who suffer an untreated pulmonary embolism die.

    Dr Toru Shirakawa, one of the researchers, warned against lengthy TV sessions that might involve back-to-back episodes of a favourite series.

    “Nowadays, with online video streaming, the term ‘binge-watching’ to describe viewing multiple episodes of television programmes in one sitting has become popular,” he said. “This popularity may reflect a rapidly growing habit.”

    It was possible to watch a lot of TV while taking simple precautions to avoid blood clots similar to those recommended for air travellers on long-haul flights, said the researchers.

    “After an hour or so, stand up, stretch, walk around, or while you’re watching TV, tense and relax your leg muscles for five minutes,” said lead researcher Prof Hiroyasu Iso. He added that drinking water and losing weight may also help.

    The study recorded viewing habits before computers, tablets and smartphones became popular sources of information and entertainment, said the scientists.

    More research is needed to assess the effect of these new technologies on pulmonary embolism risk, they said.

    Symptoms of the clots include chest pain and shortness of breath, so it can easily be mistaken for other conditions.  

    The study, reported in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, examined a range of factors which might have influenced their results, including levels of obesity, diabetes, smoking, and high blood pressure.

    After the number of hours spent watching TV, obesity appeared to have the strongest link to pulmonary embolism.

    Separate research published in the same journal found that women who did at least two and half hours of moderate exercise a week had a 25 per cent lower risk of heart disease.

    The study of women aged 27 to 44 by the Indiana University School of Public Health found that frequency of exercise did not matter, as long as total weekly time was at least 150 minutes. Brisk walking was enough to make the difference.

     

    DNC Leaks Prove That Google Bosses Put “Hit-Jobs” on Political Targets For DNC!

    _____________________________________

    Members Of The Public who find this abuse of the public interest to be as horrific as the victims find it to be, are encouraged to use the techniques and resources in this White Paper in order to help stop Google from further harm to society:

    DO IT YOURSELF ANTI_CORRUPTION TACTICS 2.5

    For Further Reading about the type of tactics and illicit deeds undertaken by Google, see the following reading material:

    ANTI-CORRUPTION BOOKS AND RESEARCH 2.1

    American Innovator Scott Douglas Redmond Receives Key U.S. Federal Government Engineering Validation

    American Innovator Scott Douglas Redmond Receives Key U.S. Federal Government Engineering Validation

    By Andrew Cohen

    New York – When you want to move high quality movies, large X-Ray files and big data sets over the internet you need to break those files up into something the internet can handle.

    Imagine trying to shove a single 15,000 pound elephant through your front door!

    It isn’t going to work very well. Let’s say that the elephant represents a high definition movie. You could push and shove and bend the elephant to try to jam him through your door. You might have to break the elephant in the process. This will be bad for both you and the elephant.

    Now let’s say you had 15,000 pounds worth of kittens that also represented that exact same movie. All you would need to do is open your door, put some catnip on the other side of the door and watch the kitties pour through the door like liquid mercury.

    That is how Bittorrent, Akamai, Kontiki and all of world’s high quality peer-to-peer mesh media distribution works; with the kittens and not the elephant. That is what Redmond invented and the federal government has now issued a large number of patent awards to Redmond to confirm it.

    Peer-to-peer mesh media distribution is the version with the kittens and the catnip. It saves billions of dollars, eliminates the buffering stalls and lags, and gives you your media in the highest possible quality.

    Redmond’s technology also has advanced versions which are “the most anti-theft media files around.”

    The United States Government was challenged with investigating the claim over who first designed, engineered, documented, launched and first sold peer-to-peer mesh networked media distribution.

    Brahm Cohen of Bittorrent and Scott have had an ongoing bet about who was first. Scott Douglas Redmond won the bet!

    The government, the document records and the NDAs proved that Redmond was up and running years before Bittorrent.

    In one of Redmond’s deployments known as CLICKMOVIE, which was the first Netflix or Youtube-type online video storefront (before either of those companies even existed), Redmond was already delivering all of the functionality of YouTube years before YouTube was even formed.

    Now Redmond is offering his technology to the world and helping disaster-relief and democracy programs with information and communication resources globally. Redmond created the first Democracy emergency services App, launched with the help of Steve Jobs and the Apple App store, for the Japanese Tsunami and later, for global refugee regions.

    Working with Sony Pictures’ most senior level executives, Redmond developed Sony Pictures MovieLink and Sony Vue online video distribution system. Redmond’s team is the only outside entity mentioned in extensive references in Sony’s own federal government patent filings.

    Redmond is strongly opposed to the use of his technology for piracy. He says that he built the technology for “efficiency and infrastructure cost savings and not for copyright violators…”

    In line with Peter Thiel’s “payback-is-a-bitch” efforts, Redmond has also been assisting with tabloid publication ethics efforts and counter-measures.

    When I asked Scott Douglas Redmond what he attributes his career of top problem solving inventions to, he says that “Luck is when preparation meets with opportunity. Observe the world around you and society will always tell you what it needs next. Then build the thing that will solve a problem for the most people.”

    Redmond has been awarded dozens of U.S. federal patents on products in use by millions of people around the globe. He has sold companies and technologies to top investment groups ranging from global developers to Microsoft staff to federal agencies.

    What is Redmond working on next? With a wink, he replies “Something big…!”

    Tags: Scott Redmond, Scott Douglas Redmond, Brahm Cohen, Sony Pictures, Bittorrent, Akamai, Kontiki, Microsoft, Peter Thiel, Movielink, Sony Vue, Sony Morpheus, ClickMovie, clickmovie.com, dropbox, qualcomm, Flashlinq, Peer-to-peer, Mesh networks, P2P Mesh, Democri-C

    Exclusive: Hillary Clinton exchanged top secret emails

     

     

    Exclusive: Hillary Clinton exchanged top secret emails

     

    Exclusive: Hillary Clinton exchanged top secret emails on her private server with three aides

     

    Exclusive: Hillary Clinton exchanged top secret emails on her private server with three aides

  • July 23, 2016 | 1:15 am

     

    Hillary Clinton exchanged nearly two-dozen top secret emails from her private server with three senior aides, the State Department revealed to VICE News late Friday.
    The 22 emails, withheld by the State Department in their entirety on grounds that disclosure would harm national security, were exchanged in 2011 and 2012 with her deputy chief of staff, Jacob Sullivan, her chief of staff, Cheryl Mills, and Deputy Secretary of State William Burns. A majority of the top secret emails are email chains between Sullivan and Clinton. This is the first time the State Department has revealed the identities of the officials who exchanged classified information with Clinton on her private email server.
    The new disclosure by the State Department comes three days before the Democratic National Convention kicks off in Philadelphia, where Clinton will formally accept her party’s nomination for president. The release of the scaled-down index of the emails and their recipients also came minutes before Clinton announced her vice presidential pick, Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia.
    (The document sent to VICE News on Friday evening lists only the recipients of the messages)
    The seven email chains, the State Department said, would cause “exceptionally grave damage” to the national security if publicly released. The State Department made the disclosure in a so-called Vaughn Index, a document prepared in Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuits in which government agencies justify the withholding of information under a FOIA exemption.
    But unlike Vaughn Indexes that other government agencies produce in FOIA cases, which often contain detailed information about what the withheld information refers to, such as weapons programs or troop movements, the State Department did not provide that information in the index it turned over to VICE News because State considers the description itself to be top secret as well. Instead, the State Department’s Vaughn Index only states who the authors and recipients of the communications were: Clinton, Sullivan, Mills, and Burns.
    The index was promptly criticized as being insufficient by Steven Aftergood, the director of the Project on Government Secrecy at the Federation of American Scientists.
    “State’s document does not fulfill the requirements for a Vaughn index,” Aftergood said, citing government rules that say the indexes must provide ample justification on the withheld materials.
    One of the top secret emails from 2012 was described by the State Department as an “email chain originating with email from a State Department official to multiple State Department officials, concluding with message to Jacob Sullivan from Secretary Clinton.” Another from the same year was an “email from a State Department official to multiple State Department officials, forwarded by Jacob Sullivan to Secretary Clinton and Cheryl Mills.” Only one classified email was exchanged with Burns. State described that one as an “email from a State Department official to multiple State Department officials, forwarded by Jacob Sullivan to Secretary Clinton, Cheryl Mills, and William Bums.”
    News reports published over the past six months, citing anonymous government officials, suggested the top secret emails referred to covert CIA drone strikes in Pakistan. Other reports said the emails may have identified CIA operatives who were working undercover.
    In a letter sent to the heads of congressional oversight committees on January 14, Charles McCullough, the intelligence community’s inspector general (ICIG), said he received two sworn declarations from the intelligence community who reviewed several dozen of Clinton’s emails and determined that her communications contained information deemed to be “CONFIDENTIAL, SECRET, and TOP SECRET/SAP.”
    Top Secret/SAP, or special access program, is a classified designation “deemed so sensitive that it requires more rigorous protection than other classified information. Such protection may include heightened ‘need to know’ requirements, cover measures, and other steps,” Aftergood added.
    At the time of the disclosure, Brian Fallon, the press secretary for Clinton’s presidential campaign, excoriated the finding.
    “We firmly oppose the complete blocking of the release of these emails,” Fallon said in a lengthy statement last January. “In at least one case, the emails appear to involve information from a published news article. This appears to be over-classification run amok. We will pursue all appropriate avenues to see that her emails are released in a manner consistent with her call last year.”
    For more than a year, Clinton has insisted she never sent or received any emails that contained classified information. But earlier this month, FBI Director James Comey announced during a news conference that Clinton did send and receive classified information and — given her position as the nation’s top diplomat — she should have known better.
    “Seven e-mail chains concern matters that were classified at the Top Secret/Special Access Program level when they were sent and received,” Comey said. “These chains involved Secretary Clinton both sending e-mails about those matters and receiving e-mails from others about the same matters. There is evidence to support a conclusion that any reasonable person in Secretary Clinton’s position, or in the position of those government employees with whom she was corresponding about these matters, should have known that an unclassified system was no place for that conversation.”
    The FBI spent a year probing Clinton’s use of a private email server and recommended to the Department of Justice that neither Clinton nor any of her aides should face charges for disseminating classified information over her private email server.
    “Although we did not find clear evidence that Secretary Clinton or her colleagues intended to violate laws governing the handling of the classified information, there is evidence that they were extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information,” Comey said.
    Clinton’s email practices have taken a notable toll on her campaign and her trustworthiness in the eyes of voters. According to a recent poll, more than half of Americans think she broke the law by exclusively using private email and a private server to conduct official business during her tenure as secretary of state.
    Separately, in court documents submitted Friday in another FOIA lawsuit VICE News filed against the FBI, this one seeking the contents of Clinton’s email server, the FBI said that on Thursday it started the process of turning over “thousands of documents” FBI agents retrieved from Clinton’s private server that her aides failed to turn over to the State Department. The FBI said it will continue to “transfer the retrieved materials to the State Department on a rolling basis … for review and determination as to whether they constitute agency records of the State Department under the Federal Records Act” and are subject to the FOIA.
    “At this time, [FBI] is unable to provide the Court with a date by which the FBI will transfer all of the retrieved materials to the State Department, or information regarding the precise volume of retrieved materials that will be transferred,” government attorneys said in a status report filed in US District Court in Washington, DC. The FBI “expects to be able to provide the Court with more information regarding the time line for the completion of the transfer of the retrieved materials, and the approximate volume of materials, in the coming weeks.”
    Additionally, the FBI said it intends to release to VICE News on August 5 two letters the FBI sent to the State Department about its investigation into Hillary Clinton’s email server and is “evaluating” whether it can also release secret declarations the bureau’s FOIA chief filed earlier this year with the federal judge presiding over our case describing how the public release of any documents would have harmed the FBI’s investigation while it was still ongoing.
    This report has been updated.
    Follow Jason Leopold on Twitter: @JasonLeopold

    Bernie Sanders Campaign Chief Says Someone Must Be ‘Accountable’ for What DNC Emails Show

    Bernie Sanders Campaign Chief Says Someone Must Be ‘Accountable’ for What DNC Emails Show

    Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton took the stage with running mate Sen. Tim Kaine for the first time today since announcing him as her vice presidential pick, telling a Miami crowd that he is “everything Donald Trump and Mike Pence are not.”

    The two walked arm and arm onto the stage at Florida International University before a crowd of more than 5,000, making it one of the largest rallies to date for Clinton’s campaign.

    Clinton took the microphone first, giving some of the reasons that she picked the Virginia senator. She announced him as her running mate via tweet Friday night.

    “As I have said, the most important qualification when you are trying to make this really big choice is, ‘Can this person step up to be president?’ Well, at every stage of Tim’s career, the people that know him best have voted to give him a promotion,” Clinton said, referring to Kaine’s career progression from mayor of Richmond, Virginia, to governor to U.S. senator.

    Clinton picked Kaine after evaluating 24 contenders, according to a campaign official. He was the only one of the contenders who met with Clinton twice. Clinton considered several potential running mates from different parts of the Democratic Party, including Senators Elizabeth Warren and Cory Booker, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Labor Secretary Tom Perez.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    In Clinton’s final meeting with Kaine, she invited him and his wife, Virginia Secretary of Education Anne Holton, to her Chappaqua, New York, home to have lunch with her, former President Bill Clinton, daughter Chelsea Clinton and Chelsea Clinton’s husband, Marc Mezvinsky, according to a campaign aide.

    Clinton called Kaine at 7:32 p.m. Friday to offer him the position. Kaine was at a fundraiser in Newport, Rhode Island. Shortly after he got the call, Kaine left the fundraiser. His former staffers and friends began celebrating in Richmond as the news was revealed.

    A Clinton campaign official said that during her decision-making process, Clinton kept reiterating her belief that Kaine could do the job of vice president. At the rally today at Florida International University, Clinton made the same point.

    He is “a leader who cares more about making a difference than making headlines,” Clinton said.

    She also described Kaine as a fighter.

    “Make no mistake. Behind that smile, Tim also has a backbone of steel. Just ask the NRA,” said Clinton in reference to Kaine’s fights against the gun-lobbying group

    Kaine showed some of his fighting spirit in his criticism of Donald Trump in the speech.

    “Do you want a ‘you’re fired’ president or a ‘you’re hired’ president?” Kaine said to the crowd.

    He was alluding to the “you’re fired” line from Trump’s former reality show, “The Apprentice,” and he also referred to Trump’s business bankruptcies.

    Clinton, said Kaine, would be a “you’re hired” president, such as through policies to build public infrastructure projects and raise the minimum wage.

    Kaine also introduced himself to the crowd by telling a little of his biography.

    “Vice president was never a job I thought about growing up in Kansas,” he said in a speech interspersed with Spanish, in which he is fluent.

    Kaine also touched on some of Clinton’s major talking points: “We are going to make the American economy work for everyone, not just those at the top,” he said.

    The senator and former Virginia governor was long viewed by pundits as one of the most qualified of the contenders on Clinton’s list of VP candidates. Although he endorsed President Obama in 2008, he was an early supporter of Clinton’s 2016 presidential bid.

    HACKED DNC EMAILS PROVE THAT DNC SET OUT TO SABOTAGE BERNIE SANDERS: Debbie Wasserman In Dutch

    Hacked emails show Democratic party hostility to Sanders

     


     

    AP Photo
    AP Photo/Mike Groll

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A cache of more than 19,000 emails from Democratic party officials, leaked in advance of Hillary Clinton’s nomination at the party’s convention next week in Philadelphia, details the acrimonious split between the Democratic National Committee and Clinton’s former rival, Sen. Bernie Sanders.

    Several emails posted by Wikileaks on its document disclosure website show DNC officials scoffing at Sanders and his supporters and in one instance, questioning his commitment to his Jewish religion. Some emails also show DNC and White House officials mulling whether to invite guests with controversial backgrounds to Democratic party events.

    Although Wikileaks’ posting of the emails Friday did not disclose the identity of who provided the private material, those knowledgeable about the breach said last month that Russian hackers had penetrated the DNC computer system. At the time, DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz said the breach was a “serious incident” and a private contractor hired to sweep the organization’s network had “moved as quickly as possible to kick out the intruders and secure our network.”

    On its web page, Wikileaks said the new cache of emails came from the accounts of “seven key figures in the DNC” and warned that the release was “part one of our new Hillary Leaks series” – an indication that more material might be published soon. Among the officials whose emails were made public were DNC spokesman Luis Miranda, national finance director Jordon Kaplan and finance chief Scott Comer, but other DNC and media figures and even some White House officials communicated with them between January 2015 and last May, Wikileaks said.

    The emails include several stinging denunciations of Sanders and his organization before and after the DNC briefly shut off his campaign’s access to the party’s key list of likely Democratic voters.

    The DNC temporarily curtailed Sanders’ access to the list in December 2015 because the organization accused the insurgent campaign of illegally tapping into confidential voter information compiled by the Clinton campaign. The Sanders campaign briefly sued the DNC but the party reached an accord with Sanders and the suit was dropped in April.

    The emails show that after the furor over the voter records was resolved, hostility simmered from top DNC officials over the Sanders campaign.

    In mid-May emails with Miranda, his deputy, Mark Paustenbach, questioned whether the DNC should use the voter record furor to raise doubts about the Sanders campaign.

    “Wondering if there’s a good Bernie narrative for a story, which is that Bernie never had his act together, that his campaign was a mess,” Paustenbach wrote. Miranda spurned the idea, although he agreed with Paustenbach’s take: “True, but the Chair has been advised not to engage. So we’ll have to leave it alone.”

    The same month, in another email to DNC officials, another official identified only as “Marshall” said of Sanders: “Does he believe in a God. He had skated on saying he has a Jewish heritage. I think I read he is an atheist. This could make several points difference with my peeps.”

    The Associated Press emailed Miranda, Paustenbach and DNC chief financial officer Brad Marshall about the Wikileaks releases but they were not immediately available for comment. Sanders campaign officials were also not immediately available after contacts from the AP.

    The Wikileaks releases also included exchanges between DNC officials and White House event planning officials about whether to allow several influential Democratic party donors to attend events where President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama were scheduled to appear. The emails contained lengthy discussions about the donors’ backgrounds, including, in some cases, criminal histories.

    One email exchange concerned whether to allow singer Ariana Grande to perform at a DNC event in the wake of an infamous online video posted on the TMZ website that showed Grande licking other customers’ doughnuts at a bakery in California. DNC officials also worried about the singer’s comment in the same video that “I hate America.” Grande, whose real name is Ariana Butera, later apologized for the comment.

    According to the emails, White House officials vetoed Grande’s performance.